Tagged: Growth

How to Use Your Creative Imagination – Review

Jenn's Review of How to Use Your Creative Imagination by Roy Eugene Davis on the Thrice Read Books blog

About this book:

An enlivening Power is nurturing the universe and we can learn to be responsive to it.

Because you are a spiritual being, you already have the ability to remove or transcend all limiting conditions that may have, until now, opposed your endeavors to live freely, enjoyably, and effectively. As this is accomplished, the necessary resources and supportive events, circumstances, and relationships for your highest good will be spontaneously provided and your spiritual growth will be rapid and satisfying. Creative imagination and skillful living will enable you to live as you deserve to live.

About the author:

Roy Eugene Davis was born in 1931 in Leavittsburg, Ohio, approximately 40 miles south of Cleveland, and grew up in a farming community. In his early teenage years he frequented the public library, reading books on psychology, philosophy, and yoga. When he was 18 years of age, he read Paramahansa Yogananda’s Autobiography of a Yogi and immediately sensed a spiritual connection with Yogananda and the kriya yoga tradition. In December 1949, he traveled to Los Angeles, California, to meet his guru (teacher) and was accepted for monastic discipleship training.

Mr. Davis was ordained by Paramahansa Yogananda in 1951 and was appointed as the minister of the Phoenix, Arizona, Self-Realization Fellowship Center in March 1952. In late 1953, aware of a need to learn to live effectively in the secular world, he withdrew from the organization–but not from his relationship with the kriya yoga tradition or his commitment to serve. After 2 years in the U.S. Army Medical Corps at Fort Riley, Kansas, he began his mission as an independent teacher. Since then, he has taught in more than 100 cities in North America and in Japan, Brazil, Europe, West Africa, and India.

Some of his books are published in 10 languages and in 11 countries. He is also the publisher of Truth Journal magazine and writes monthly lessons for CSA members around the world.

Jenn’s Review:

For those of us that create as part of our chosen vocation, creativity can be a spiritual practice. In his short book, How to Use Your Creative Imagination, Mr. Davis lays out a simple framework for treating your spiritual practice as a creative practice.

Creative Imagination is a clear, concise read that can easily be finished in an afternoon (it’s only 29 pages in Kindle edition), and is worth saving for regular rereading.

Mr. Davis has extensive spiritual training, and this shows in this book. While he makes a number of valid points, I found his writing to be a bit preachy and judgmental at times. Despite those few moments, this is a worthy read for anyone embarking on a creative or spiritual journey (the two are intertwined and inseparable).

Buy this book:

This book is available in Kindle format from Amazon here. [affiliate link]

New Rules for Positive Parenting – Review

Thrice Read Books reviews New Rules for Positive Parenting by Jerre Ader

About this book:

Published April 12, 2016 by Difference Press

Parenting is a responsibility of epic proportions. As a parent, you’ll have your child for a year when they are a baby, four years when they’re a toddler, and preschooler, a child for five years, and then for eight years when they’re a preteen and a teenager. Then you are mostly done with your job of parenting. How you do this job of parenting will have an impact on your child for the rest of their life. 

But, don’t despair! There are no perfect parents. We didn’t have them, our parents didn’t have them, and our children won’t either. However, we can all be parents who are good enough. 

In New Rules for Positive Parenting, author Jerre Ader reviews research on new brain science and attachment theory and what it tells us about raising secure children. She describes how beliefs and behavior patterns, or schemas, can be developed in childhood and stay with us and impact our thinking and behavior as adults. The way a person describes the childhood they had provides useful information about how their own child is likely to attach. 

Your attachment style impacts 90 percent of your relationships. The attachment process occurs throughout the life span. You will learn how you can develop acquired secure attachment and pass that secure attachment on to your child. 

Parents who change can change their children.

Jenn’s Review:

It’s been a while since I read a book that left me undecided on whether I liked it (or agreed with it, in the case of nonfiction). Jerre Ader’s New Rules for Positive Parenting falls in that category.

I got this book because our daughter recently rounded the teen mark and with that, came her desire to attend brick and mortar public school for the first time. What we had going on worked, but I knew we could improve our relationship.

New Rules does lay down valuable, science based information on attachment, and some of the ways parents can foster better relationships with their children. Ms. Ader also makes valid points about how our own childhood attachment wounds affect adults, and those remaining wounds go on to affect our relationships with our children, I felt her suggestions on how adults can heal these wounds fell short of helpful. [Note: I’ve read a number of the reviews for this book on Amazon, and she’s gotten a number of 5 stars, with a large number of those from self-identified therapists – Maybe my lack of understanding in this department, specifically in psychology contributes to this.]

I also struggled with her whole insistence that we should not tell our children “no.” I’ve heard this idea before, and I simply cannot get on board with it. Times will always arise where trying to compromise or conversate a child (whether 3 or 15) is neither appropriate nor practical. 

I would recommend this book to new or want-to-be-parents, especially. Parents with older children may, like me, struggle with this information, whether from deep seated patterns (from childhood and current situations) or from practical experience. Like any nonfiction work, my recommendation is to approach it with an open mind and take away anything useful you find. 

Thrice Read Books review of Jerre Ader's New Rules for Positive Parenting - Nonfiction - Self Help - Parenting - eBooks

Purchase this book:

This book is available from Amazon in Kindle format here. [affiliate link]

Grow Your Author Platform or Meet a Few Authors

Authors and writers…

You know how everyone keeps saying that you need to build your author platform, and one of the best ways to do that, is by connecting with readers? 

We want to help you.

#HowDoIWriteThee week 1 schedule

Readers…

Have you ever read through a novel, only to sit back at the end, and wonder what the author is like?

We want to help you, too.

#HowDoIWriteThee week 2

Thrice Read Books is partnering with Sage Wolfsong (yes, the same one that blogs Jenn Bradshaw’s book reviews here on TRB.com) and Allie McCormack (author of Truck Stop, which is sold here at TRB.com) to bring you a 31-day hashtag event to help authors and readers connect.

Meet #InsideAWriter and #HowDoIWriteThee. We’re hoping this will be the first of many writing-related events hosted by TRB.

#HowDoIWriteThee week 3

In a series of 31 questions, readers can find out what you snack on while you write, what characters you connect with the deepest and how they can follow you on social media and subscribe to your newsletters.

Over the month of January, authors can connect with new and existing readers as we work together to build our platforms and our audiences. 

#HowDoIWriteThee week 4

If you haven’t caught on yet, Thrice Read Books is really jazzed about helping authors connect with audiences and building their platform. #HowDoIWriteThee is all about this idea.

Yeah, we’re giving you a huge sneak peak at the topics here in this blog post, but don’t worry. We’ll tweet with the week’s topics as we post the daily question. 

The Rules (yes… we must):

We’ll keep it simple – Thrice Read Books will post the question at a few minutes after midnight (Jenn’s an obsessive planner, and likes to use scheduling tools wherever she can, so we promise… the posts will be there on time – unless the unthinkable happens and something crashes). Be sure to follow Thrice Read Books on Twitter – that’s the single best way to make sure you don’t miss this event. Authors: Comment on the thread with your answer to the day’s question. You can add either or both hashtags to your posts (#HowDoIWriteThee or #InsideAWriter) to help us promote the event. Readers: Follow the thread! Please feel free to interact with the writers and authors that are participating. Follow new connections, visit their blogs and websites, check out their books and get on their email lists. 

Because we want this to be as friendly as possible for everyone, please refrain from being rude. You might not realize it, but it takes a lot of effort for writers to put out their work and connect with readers (a good majority of us are introverts, and many of us would rather hide out in our writer’s caves and avoid social media – alas, this does not sell books!). We are here to support both readers and writers, and we want this to be fun, most of all.

#HowDoIWriteThee week 5

Have we convinced you yet?

Follow Thrice Read Books and the tags #InsideAWriter and #HowDoIWriteThee to keep up with the daily questions (one a day, and they’re pretty easy). Authors – Comment on the daily question. Readers – try to connect with at least one author a day, in the form of visiting their blog, website or follow them on Twitter.

It’s coming up quick, and we look forward to seeing you there!

Inside the Miracle – Book Review

I mentioned this book a week or so ago in another of my blog threads, but having finished the book, I’d like to give it some more thorough attention. (This post contains an affiliate link)

Mark Nepo wrote Inside the Miracle: Enduring Suffering, Approaching Wholeness as a reflective work, looking back over his journey through two rounds of cancer, divorce, the deaths of close family and friends and finding his way back to a different surface of life to fully embrace vulnerability, living, loving and the suffering that is part and parcel of a life fully lived and experienced. 

It is a collection of essays, poems and short, reflective stories about his life and the emotions and revelations he encountered during this journey and includes reflective writing exercises for the reader to dive deeper if they so choose.

In order to fully experience Life, we must be open to all it offers. It’s easy to harden oneself to the harder emotions; broken hearts, loving another through separation or illness, and loss are all far more difficult to handle than joy, pleasure and new love. Yet Nepo posits that Life will break one open through suffering, and those that embrace the less pleasant alongside the joys are the ones that truly live. 

This book was deeply touching, and some parts were more relevant than others. Some passages brought to mind difficult days that are long in the past for me, and others seemed to touch me right where I am in this moment. I would recommend it to anyone on a spiritual path of discovering themselves more deeply, whether you use the journal prompts or not (though, for a deeper experience, I recommend using the prompts).

Inside the Miracle is available in a variety of formats, including hardback and Kindle. You can check it out here: