Tagged: Nonfiction

Inside the Miracle – Book Review

I mentioned this book a week or so ago in another of my blog threads, but having finished the book, I’d like to give it some more thorough attention. (This post contains an affiliate link)

Mark Nepo wrote Inside the Miracle: Enduring Suffering, Approaching Wholeness as a reflective work, looking back over his journey through two rounds of cancer, divorce, the deaths of close family and friends and finding his way back to a different surface of life to fully embrace vulnerability, living, loving and the suffering that is part and parcel of a life fully lived and experienced. 

It is a collection of essays, poems and short, reflective stories about his life and the emotions and revelations he encountered during this journey and includes reflective writing exercises for the reader to dive deeper if they so choose.

In order to fully experience Life, we must be open to all it offers. It’s easy to harden oneself to the harder emotions; broken hearts, loving another through separation or illness, and loss are all far more difficult to handle than joy, pleasure and new love. Yet Nepo posits that Life will break one open through suffering, and those that embrace the less pleasant alongside the joys are the ones that truly live. 

This book was deeply touching, and some parts were more relevant than others. Some passages brought to mind difficult days that are long in the past for me, and others seemed to touch me right where I am in this moment. I would recommend it to anyone on a spiritual path of discovering themselves more deeply, whether you use the journal prompts or not (though, for a deeper experience, I recommend using the prompts).

Inside the Miracle is available in a variety of formats, including hardback and Kindle. You can check it out here:

The Art of the Pendulum – Book Review

*Contains Affiliate Links*

When it comes to things mystical and magical, Cassandra Eason’s body of work is a great place for beginners to start.

In this particular volume, Ms. Eason explains what a pendulum is, how to choose or make one, and how they can be used (from decision making to finding oil and your way home). Her writing is simple, straightforward and uncomplicated.

I’ve done a little pendulum work in some of Elle North‘s intuition courses, but wanted some more in-depth information to fiddle with on my own. I found this book to be an amazing resource.

You can check out your local library’s stacks for this book, or find it here on Amazon.

Goddesses for Every Day – Book Review

I’ve been diving deep into my heart space recently, and digging back into the Sacred Feminine as I embark on another writing journey. {Note: this post contains an affiliate link.}

While scratching around in my personal collection of books, I came across a book I purchased several years ago, titled Goddesses for Every Day – Exploring the Wisdom and Power of the Divine Feminine Around the World by Julie Loar.

Like a perpetual calendar, Goddesses is a book that you can pick up any time of the year, and reread it each year. One page per day, the entries take only moments to read and are arranged by theme around the traditional Western Zodiac. These are truly international goddesses and representations of the sacred feminine, with deities from every culture and hemisphere imaginable covered.

Dive deep and explore the inter-connectedness of all that is sacred and divine in the feminine with this book from Julie Loar. Available in paperback or Kindle format from Amazon here.

The Mini-Atlas of Snakes of the World

Review by Sam Bradshaw; the book itself can be purchased here.

This is a very interesting book.  Not full of information you never wanted to know but comes with basic information for over 500 species of snakes.  Simple pictures to help you understand the snake with a great key to understanding the pictures. Great reference book or if you love snakes great to have for your collection.

The Templars and the Grail – Book Review

About the book:

Who were the medieval Knights Templar?  How did they become so powerful and influential?  Why were they suddenly arrested and tortured in 1307?  What happened after their suppression?  And how does their memory live on today?

The powerful Knights Templar, famed monastic warriors of the Crusades, have long been shrouded in mystery.  They were believed to conduct mystical rites, guard various relics, and perhaps possess the lost treasures of Jerusalem.  They were also bankers to kings, trusted diplomats, skilled farmers, business scions, and navigators.  Drawing on both academic and local sources, this book provides a solidly researched, up-to-date academic history of the Order of the Temple, the Knights Templar (Part One), while also examining various theories about the Templars and their enduring mythos today (Part Two).

A vital contribution to medieval Templar history, 12th-14th century medieval religious studies, Crusades studies, Grail and related literature, and an analysis of modern-day interest in the medieval Order of the Temple (1119-1312).  Appendices include a comprehensive Chronology of Events (1118-1571), a list of Grand Masters,  information on major Templar sites, and illustrations featuring Rosslyn Chapel (Scotland) and its museum exhibition.

Brian’s Review:

 If you have ever heard of the Knight Templars, the holy grail, or even the crusades, then this book is right up your alley.  This work of nonfiction is master piece put together on the history of this great and powerful knights, from their rise to the their fall, and what may or may not have happened to them afterwards.  If history was taught the way this book was put together, kids in high school would be yearning for their history classes.  I can’t rave enough about this book

Buy the book:

Thrice Read Books has a paperback edition of this book for sale here.

You can also buy this book in paperback or Kindle format from Amazon here. [affiliate link]

Eat Pray Love – Book Review

About the book:

Eat Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert (Contains Affiliate Link)

This beautifully written, heartfelt memoir touched a nerve among both readers and reviewers. Elizabeth Gilbert tells how she made the difficult choice to leave behind all the trappings of modern American success (marriage, house in the country, career) and find, instead, what she truly wanted from life. Setting out for a year to study three different aspects of her nature amid three different cultures, Gilbert explored the art of pleasure in Italy and the art of devotion in India, and then a balance between the two on the Indonesian island of Bali. By turns rapturous and rueful, this wise and funny author (whom Booklist calls “Anne Lamott’s hip, yoga- practicing, footloose younger sister”) is poised to garner yet more adoring fans. 

Jenn’s Review:

Admittedly, I saw the movie before reading the book. (I was beyond thrilled to discover that it was a book, and snatched it up when I found it) The book, by far, is the better time investment. Gilbert is an incredible, intense story teller, and this book has touched so many lives, in so many deep ways (my life included). It catalyzed the spiritual journey that I began about 6 years ago, and helped me to figure out that I did indeed need to answer some of the deeper questions that I’d put off for years. Utterly relate-able to any woman who has been through divorce, depression, yearning or longing of any kind, this is in my top 10 books that I want my daughter to read someday.

Buy the book:

Thrice Read Books has one copy of this book in inventory. Buy it here.

You can also buy this book (10th Anniversary edition) from Amazon in paperback, kindle, hardcover, audible, or audio CD here. [affiliate link]